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What's new across the RIN

GPS technology for the master criminal
19/02/2015

"GPS technology for the master criminal - How Criminals are using GPS to their advantage"


The IMO and Future Maritime Legislation
02/02/2015

An evening seminar with Arsenio Dominguez, Panama's ambassador to the IMO.


The Little Known Story of C- Class Submarine Operations in the Baltic in WW1
12/03/2015

A joint event with Royal Lymington YC, followed by supper


Cambria, 86 Years Old and Still Being Chased On the Race Course
19/03/2015

Joint SCG/RTYC talk by Chris Barkham, skipper of the Cambria.


The Anderson Memorial Lecture
02/03/2015

Where next for GNSS? Professor Terry Moore explores the future for Global Navigation Satellite Systems

Our History: Building and Growing

Throughout the 1970s, the working parties began to publish reports on navigation and safety issues. They covered topics from the importance of traffic separation and collision prevention in the maritime environment to fuel reserves in aircraft. As the Institute's focus broadened, it began to organise conferences to discuss these issues, on both a national and an international level.

But navigation itself had not stood still. First the development of Loran, and then in 1978, the launch of the first GPS satellite, threatened to overwhelm the very idea of needing a Royal Institute of Navigation, as position-finding became a relatively automatic - and automated - function. However, the broad church of the RIN ensured it not only survived, but found a way to thrive in the new era of satellite navigation.

In 1984, a 'Way Ahead Group' appointed by the RIN Council recommended several crucial additions to its profile, including the creation of Special Interest Groups and the launch of a populist newsletter. This later became Navigation News. It was also during the early 1980s that the Institute broadened its focus again to include animal navigation in its remit, and moved to proactively recruit younger members.

These moves, allied to a determination to embrace global satellite navigation systems and information technology as important elements in modern navigation, helped the RIN evolve into a 21st century organisation, with a broad range of support and interests. Between 1984-1994, the Institute ran a series of larger European conferences and added more and more Special Interest Groups to its portfolio, including the Land Navigation and Location Group and the Navigation on Foot Group, to reflect the growth in popularity of navigation hobbies such as geocaching, hillwalking and orienteering.

The creation of a range of competitions helped the Institute attract younger members and, more recently, we have added significant numbers of university students to the membership.